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Cheek cell stained with Wright’s stain

Cheek cell stained with Wright’s stain

Cheek cell stained with wrights and safranin

Cheek cell stained with wrights and safranin

Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not: the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.
Calvin Coolidge (via annaleeporter)

one of my current “bore your ears off” ideas, is that much of the advances of the next few years can easily come from re-combining existing tools and techniques, and miniaturizing, or making portable, and “bringing to bear” of existing technologies, rather than breakthrough ideas. (obviously there’s always the possibility of a “black swan” occurrence which renders our existing toolkit obsolete) But there is much hay to be made with the current amount of sunshine.

I think this is a wonderful example, and suitably developed could reduce the need for over aggressive surgery, and indeed, the need for repeat procedures to perform excisions.

medicalstate:

When it comes to cancer surgery today, tumours must be removed and specimens sent to pathologists for review. The problem is knowing how much or how little you have; cut too much and you may hurt the patient; cut too little and you will leave cancer behind. Only once there are satisfactory margins - a buffer zone of normal cells that indicates the tumour is completely resected - can the surgery be finished. To check with the pathologist was always time consuming.

Now, Dr. Zoltan Takats from the Imperial College London has created the iKnife system, an electric cautery with an attached mass spectrometer to sample the smoke let off by cauterized flesh to differentiate between cancerous and non-cancerous cells in real time.